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Challenging the Pope

5 Responses

  1. Michael Alley says:

    By disallowing divorced people to receive the Blessed Sacrament the church in fact is making them second class members of the body of Christ.
    This not only affects the person concerned but touches that persons whole family and any future children who may be born from a subsequent marriage performed at a different religious Christian denomination.
    The catholic faith loses maybe two or more generations of the affected family.
    I therefore support Pope Francis.

  2. Tieho Mothibe says:

    “but counselled an approach of case-by-case discernment” as far as we know this is the practice in the Orthodox Church, these words are confusing and really do need to be explained. I pride myself as a Catholic over the fact that I can explain my faith and its practices. Being a Catechist myself, how would I aswer someone in RCIA class who requested that I explain this statement? The cardinals unlike soldiers are not to follow blindly what they are told. They speak for many of us when they need clarity from the Pope. Radicalism develops from blind followers of any religion. Lets be honest and true as Catholics, where in the Catechism can you find the above statement, please if anyone can explain this to me clearly of what it means may be I would not share the perspective of the cardinals.

  3. MagdaKus says:

    To my mind, in our times at least (I don’t feel qualified to comment about past centuries) the Church has previously acknowledged that situations are less”black & white” than fundamentalists like to think. For instance in case of suicide or gender orientation. Some others prefer a blanket condemnation. Having said that, with this latest there’s plenty of room for misunderstanding and misinterpretation.

  4. Jonathan says:

    “By disallowing divorced people to receive the Blessed Sacrament the church in fact is making them second class members of the body of Christ.” – Not so. Receiving communion is not some kind of right. It is a gift. The Eucharist is a sign of unity and loving submission to the Heart of Christ. Jesus is clear that divorce is not His intention and the Church has continued to teach this truth.

    “This not only affects the person concerned but touches that persons whole family and any future children who may be born from a subsequent marriage performed at a different religious Christian denomination.” – I would like to know how. If each individual is in right-standing they may receive communion and be married in the Catholic Church. There are many from mixed marriages who are currently Catholic.

    A Catholic who wanted to live out their Faith would firstly not put themselves in a situation where they would need a second marriage, secondly not be married in another denomination, nor would they be married in the court. Divorce is an ugly thing and sometimes there are very good reasons for it, but one must not try and excuse bad choices. Ultimately the couple decided to get married, they consummated it and things did not work out.

    “The catholic faith loses maybe two or more generations of the affected family.” – this make little sense. If someone chooses to leave the Faith over the the fact that their parents or that they themselves are disobedient to Church teaching, that is their business. It is sad, definitely, but why stay if you do not believe?

    “I therefore support Pope Francis.” – this is your right, but I would suggest a thorough reading of the Scriptures, catechism and the teachings of the early Church. I feel that this may be more an issue of the heart that an issue of faith for you personally.

  5. Jonathan says:

    “Cardinals owe a special loyalty to the pope.” – except when we find ourselves in a situation such as this. There is nothing wrong with giving a particular issue “room to breathe”, but when it fundamentally opens itself to misunderstanding and misinterpretation, there is a real problem. I applaud the cardinals for being brave enough to stand up and be counted. Even now, there are other member of the clergy who are beginning to ask the same questions. The laity are also seeing that something is amiss.